< See More Results
 
A
B
Miles     Kilometers
  Reset

Magoffin County Historical Society

Not Rated Not Rated

191 S Church St, Salyersville, KY 41465
http://www.rootsweb.com/~kymhs
Email this business
(606) 349-1607
 
History: Sitting on the banks of the Licking River in present day Salyersville, KY, near the site where Dr. Thomas Walker encamped in 1750 on his journey from the Cumberland Gap on the Warrior's Trail to his residence at Castlewood, VA, lies a small g...read more
History: Sitting on the banks of the Licking River in present day Salyersville, KY, near the site where Dr. Thomas Walker encamped in 1750 on his journey from the Cumberland Gap on the Warrior's Trail to his residence at Castlewood, VA, lies a small group of reconstructed cabins locally known as the Prater's Fort Log Cabin Pioneer Village Complex. Dr. Walker provided us with the first description of this area telling that it was a "great sea of cane, teeming with elk." He named the river Fredericks' River and wrote that he could see an Indian encampment across its banks. He called the nearby stream that pours into the river "Falling Creek" and this was the stream he crossed to what he called "Paint Creek" and on to what he named the "Louisa River." The history of these log cabins and the local historical society is so intertwined that it would be impossible to separate the two. The Magoffin County Historical Society was organized in April of 1978. Our first project was participating in the Kentucky Historical Society cemetery mapping project for Magoffin County. As people became aware of our existence we began receiving many requests for information about the area and we began printing the JOURNAL OF THE MAGOFFIN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY to preserve and disseminate the history and genealogy that we were collecting. Our projects began to blossom and 1979 found our group sponsoring the first Magoffin County Founder's Day. The central aim of our first Annual Founder's Day was to research the family of William "Uncle Billy" Adams, founder of Adamsville, forerunner of Salyersville. We printed a 117 page Adams book that year and unveiled a large black granite pyramid marker that we dedicated to the early founder's of Magoffin County with William Adams' name being the first inscribed. The following year the Prater family was the subject of Founder's Day as Archibald Prater, a Revolutionary War soldier, was the first known settler in our area identified at that time as Prater's Fort. The historical society acquired the old Birchfield log home located on the Birch Branch of Burning Fork that year. The original floor of the cabin was utilized during Founder's Days that year as a stage area where various pageants, plays, music, and talent shows were held. The following year another cabin, the Williams family log home, was acquired from the mouth of Hell's Half Acre on Paint Creek in neighboring Johnson County. This structure was built adjacent to the stage area and a roof was added to the stage that was shingled with boards rived on the spot by the late Arvel Salyer. His handiwork is still visible as both cabins were shingled from the same red oak boards. The third year the Salyer family was honored, as Samuel Salyer had been the State Representative in 1859-1860 when Magoffin County was formed from Floyd, Morgan, and Johnson counties. The aforementioned pyramid marker now had all four sides inscribed and books of local family history had been printed each year. In addition, we continued to print our quarterly, a 40-page Journal and also printed various marriage, cemetery, census, and other books, even an "Olde Tyme Cookbook" with family stories added to the recipes of by gone times. Another log home was reconstructed and an additional stage area was built during our fourth year. This was a two-story structure known as the Kennard home from the Middle Fork section of our county. It had been used as the first school in that area. Ernie Conley rived enough shingles from one huge tree to re-shingle this cabin and stage. The Patrick families were honored this fourth year and we purchased another large granite marker designed so that early settler inscriptions for a number of years could be inscribed on it. These two markers have become tourist attractions for our county. Our fifth year, the year of the Arnett family reunion, brought us another log building. This one was formerly known as the Long Fork Church and School House. It had been bu
 
 

Business Details

Are You the Business Owner?

Claim your free business listing on Superpages.com and add important information about your business online. The more reviews and additional information you provide about your business, the easier it will be for customers to find you online.

  • Manage your reviews and ratings
  • Create coupons
  • Connect with customers

Reviews

Not RatedNot Yet Rated | Write a Review

Blogs


 
 
Browse to locate your photos. All photos are subject
to review and take at least 24 hours to appear on the site.

JPEG or GIF only, no larger than 5MB
Enter a title for your photo and upload.

By uploading a photo you are agreeing to our Photo Guidelines
 
Data provided by one or more of the following: SuperMedia, Acxiom, Infogroup
User Generated Content Guidelines
    Edit this Business Info - Publishing Guidelines
  • User provided updates will not over-write updates provided by the business owner.
  • Superpages.com's editorial department will review the updates, but does not validate the updates with the business.
  • Information provided will be screened and must meet the Content Guidelines before it is published on Superpages.com.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online.
    Photos - Publishing Guidelines
  • For photos to publish, the user has to be a registered Superpages.com user.
  • The user will receive an email from Superpages.com asking them to click the link verifying that the photo can be published on Superpages.com.
  • All photos will be edited by Superpages.com staff.
  • The photos must meet the Superpages.com Photo Guidelines.
    • The Content was created by me or by my employees or by a third party who has given me written permission to use the Content in the manner contemplated by the Application.
    • If the Content includes a person or persons, I have obtained from each person in the photo the unrestricted right to use the photo.
    • I have the unrestricted right and authority to use the Content in any media and in any advertising published under the Application in the way it is used.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online
    Business Blogs - Publishing Guidelines
  • For Business Blogs to publish, the user has to be a registered Superpages.com user.
  • The user will receive an email from Superpages.com asking them to click the link verifying that the blog can be published on Superpages.com.
  • Blogs will be edited by Superpages.com staff.
  • The Blogs must meet the Superpages.com Content Guidelines.
  • Superpages.com reserves the right to remove any content that does not conform to policy.
  • By submitting information, you are granting Superpages.com permission to publish the information you provided.
  • Most submissions take at least 24 hours and may take up to a week to appear online.
    Abuse Policy
  • Content that is not acceptable can be reported through our Report Abuse link. Superpages.com staff will review all reports and remove those that violate policy.
  • The following may be considered abusive and lead to the removal of content:
    • Profane, obscene, abusive, offensive, objectionable, unintelligible language.
    • Adult material, including graphic images, written images, URLs, or links.
    • Negative comments about individual employees, including names.
    • References to another company, whether by name, domain name, trademarks or service marks.
    • Malicious intent

History: Sitting on the banks of the Licking River in present day Salyersville, KY, near the site where Dr. Thomas Walker encamped in 1750 on his journey from the Cumberland Gap on the Warrior's Trail to his residence at Castlewood, VA, lies a small group of reconstructed cabins locally known as the Prater's Fort Log Cabin Pioneer Village Complex. Dr. Walker provided us with the first description of this area telling that it was a "great sea of cane, teeming with elk." He named the river Fredericks' River and wrote that he could see an Indian encampment across its banks. He called the nearby stream that pours into the river "Falling Creek" and this was the stream he crossed to what he called "Paint Creek" and on to what he named the "Louisa River." The history of these log cabins and the local historical society is so intertwined that it would be impossible to separate the two. The Magoffin County Historical Society was organized in April of 1978. Our first project was participating in the Kentucky Historical Society cemetery mapping project for Magoffin County. As people became aware of our existence we began receiving many requests for information about the area and we began printing the JOURNAL OF THE MAGOFFIN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY to preserve and disseminate the history and genealogy that we were collecting. Our projects began to blossom and 1979 found our group sponsoring the first Magoffin County Founder's Day. The central aim of our first Annual Founder's Day was to research the family of William "Uncle Billy" Adams, founder of Adamsville, forerunner of Salyersville. We printed a 117 page Adams book that year and unveiled a large black granite pyramid marker that we dedicated to the early founder's of Magoffin County with William Adams' name being the first inscribed. The following year the Prater family was the subject of Founder's Day as Archibald Prater, a Revolutionary War soldier, was the first known settler in our area identified at that time as Prater's Fort. The historical society acquired the old Birchfield log home located on the Birch Branch of Burning Fork that year. The original floor of the cabin was utilized during Founder's Days that year as a stage area where various pageants, plays, music, and talent shows were held. The following year another cabin, the Williams family log home, was acquired from the mouth of Hell's Half Acre on Paint Creek in neighboring Johnson County. This structure was built adjacent to the stage area and a roof was added to the stage that was shingled with boards rived on the spot by the late Arvel Salyer. His handiwork is still visible as both cabins were shingled from the same red oak boards. The third year the Salyer family was honored, as Samuel Salyer had been the State Representative in 1859-1860 when Magoffin County was formed from Floyd, Morgan, and Johnson counties. The aforementioned pyramid marker now had all four sides inscribed and books of local family history had been printed each year. In addition, we continued to print our quarterly, a 40-page Journal and also printed various marriage, cemetery, census, and other books, even an "Olde Tyme Cookbook" with family stories added to the recipes of by gone times. Another log home was reconstructed and an additional stage area was built during our fourth year. This was a two-story structure known as the Kennard home from the Middle Fork section of our county. It had been used as the first school in that area. Ernie Conley rived enough shingles from one huge tree to re-shingle this cabin and stage. The Patrick families were honored this fourth year and we purchased another large granite marker designed so that early settler inscriptions for a number of years could be inscribed on it. These two markers have become tourist attractions for our county. Our fifth year, the year of the Arnett family reunion, brought us another log building. This one was formerly known as the Long Fork Church and School House. It had been bu